Published on 27/07/2022
University researchers use science of light to reduce pesticides used to protect crops from pests and diseases
  • The science of light to be used to help fight crop infestation
  • Photonic ‘nose’ to be developed to monitor crops
  • Each year, plant diseases cost the global economy over $220 billion.

​​​​Experts at two Midlands universities are starting a new project to develop a photonic ‘nose’ to monitor crops for pest infestations and plant disease.   

Aston University is collaborating with Harper Adams University to research and develop technology using light to monitor crop health. 

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations annually up to 40 percent of global crop production is lost to pests. Each year, plant diseases cost the global economy over $220 billion, and invasive insects at least $70 billion.

The Midlands-based research will be using strawberries to test the new technology. The fruit is worth £350 million to the UK economy but it is vulnerable to potato aphid which has the potential to wipe out an annual harvest. [1] 

Currently crops are treated with pesticides, but there’s increasing pressure to find alternatives due to the environmental impact. 

One method is to use integrated pest management (IPM) to create an early warning system. It monitors plants for build-up of insects and diseases rather than spraying plants with chemicals, but so far it’s proven unreliable and expensive.  

The new project uses recent developments in photonics technology that can analyse low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants, which indicate their health. This is coupled with machine learning hardware which makes it practical to use artificial intelligence in commercial settings. 

Professor David Webb of Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies (AIPT) said: “Better invertebrate pest and plant disease monitoring technologies will significantly help cut crop losses.

“However most electronic noses use electrochemical sensors, which suffer from sensitivity issues, sensor drift/aging effects and lack specificity. 

“We intend to address this by building on the fast-moving technology of photonics - the science of light - whilst collaborating with scientists in other disciplines.”

The 12-month project is to receive £200,000 from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the Natural Environment Research Council. The grant is the maximum amount given from their molecules to landscapes project, which funds interdisciplinary solutions to ‘real world’ challenges.

Dr Joe Roberts from Harper Adams University said: “With the projected increase in the global population there is increasing pressure on the agricultural sector to achieve higher crop yields.

“Reducing crop losses within existing production systems will improve food security without increasing resource use. 

“We intend to establish an interdisciplinary community of agricultural science, optical sensing and machine learning experts to develop novel plant health monitoring platforms that enhance agricultural production through localised pest and disease monitoring to detect hotspots.”

[1] Lieten (2012) International Journal of Fruit Science 5: 91-105


Photo caption: potato aphid

Notes to editors

Founded in 1895 and a University since 1966, Aston is a long established university led by its three main beneficiaries – students, business and the professions, and our region and society. Aston University is located in Birmingham and at the heart of a vibrant city and the campus houses all the university’s academic, social and accommodation facilities for our students. Saskia Loer Hansen is the interim Vice-Chancellor & Chief Executive.

Aston University was named University of the Year 2020 by The Guardian and the University’s full time MBA programme has been ranked in the top 100 in the world in the Economist MBA 2021 ranking. The Aston MBA has been ranked 12th in the UK and 85th in the world.

For media inquiries in relation to this release, contact Nicola Jones, Press and Communications Manager, on (+44)7825 342091 or email n.jones6@aston.ac.uk

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Sue Smith, Head of Press and Communications
    0121 204 3521
    s.p.smith@aston.ac.uk

Sam Cook, Press and Communications Manager
    0121 204 5065
    s.cook2@aston.ac.uk

Rebecca Hume, Press and Communications Manager
    0121 204 5159
    r.hume@aston.ac.uk

Nicola Jones, Press and Communications Manager
  •  07825 342091
    n.jones6@aston.ac.uk

Alternatively, email pr@aston.ac.uk

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