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Dr Joanne Taylor

Lecturer in Psychology

School of Life & Health Sciences

Aston University
Aston Triangle
Birmingham
B4 7ET

Tel: +44 (0) 121 204 4003
Email:j.taylor13@aston.ac.uk
Room: Room SW507c

Dr Joanne Taylor

I joined Aston in 2017 as a Lecturer in Psychology, where I am affiliated to the Behavioural and Applied Neurosciences Group (BANG).

My research investigates the way we learn to read, in particular how we learn the relationship between a word’s spelling and its sound and meaning. In my experiments, adults learn to read new words written in an unfamiliar alphabet, to simulate what it’s like for children learning to read for the first time. I look at how different factors affect learning, and also use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to look at how the brain responds to these new languages.

  • PhD Experimental Psychology, the University of Oxford 2009
  • MSc Research Methods in Psychology, the University of Oxford 2005
  • BA Psychology, the University of Oxford, 2004
  • 2017 – present: Lecturer, Aston University
  • 2014 – 2017: Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Royal Holloway University of London
  • 2009 – 2014: Research Fellow, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge
  • 2010-2013: Research Fellow in Science, Newnham College, University of Cambridge

I am broadly interested in how humans learn new information, for example:

  • Learning to read
  • Learning object names
  • Learning a new language

I am also interested in the factors that affect learning, for example:

  • Type of information (visual/auditory)
  • Learning schedule
  • Sleep
  • Individual differences

3-year ESRC project grant (ES/L002264/1, £480,000) named co-investigator and co-wrote application

3-year stipendiary research fellowship at Newnham College, University of Cambridge

2-year MRC/ESRC interdisciplinary postdoctoral fellowship (MC_US_A060_0041, £121,622) obtained through external competition

4-year MSc + PhD MRC/ESRC interdisciplinary studentship obtained through external competition

Co-supervision of projects conducted by:

Adam Jowett, Royal Holloway University of London. Adam is investigating the impact of literacy acquisition on spoken language processing, using fMRI and artificial languages.

Connor Quinn, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge. Connor is conducting studies into the role of sleep on learning of new words and objects, using fMRI and artificial languages.

Viktoria Havas, University of Barcelona. Viktoria investigated how we learn new words that are similar to or different from our native language, and looked at the role of sleep in this process, using fMRI and novel words.

Experimental Psychology Society