.

Become a Postgraduate Mentor

Being a Postgraduate Mentor is a great way to support the development of a first year postgraduate student whilst developing your own skills


What does a Postgraduate Mentor do?

Postgraduate mentors are experienced Postgraduate students who provide pastoral support, offer advice, guidance and practical tips. They act as a sounding board, helping first year Postgraduates to focus their thinking and find new ways to explore and solve problems. They are not supervisors and do not get involved in the academic or technical aspects of Phd support. Subject matching is not always possible and Mentors and mentees are matched according to availability, location or other preferences.

What are the benefits of becoming a Postgraduate Mentor?

Being a Postgraduate mentor is a great way to support the development of a first year Postgraduate student. It gives you the opportunity to share your own valuable experience and meet other students with similar interests. You will be making a huge difference to a mentee's learning journey and the mentoring process will help you to develop a range of personal and transferable skills which makes your CV more attractive to employers. You will receive comprehensive training and a certificate of participation.

PhD students: Register as a Postgraduate Mentor here

How can I become a Postgraduate Mentor?

Simply click on the link above and complete a Postgraduate Mentor Registration Form. You will then be invited to a short training session and matched to a first year postgraduate student.


*If you have problems with the online form or would prefer to complete an emailed version, please request a Registration Form by emailing: pgmentoring@aston.ac.uk

For more information please contact:

Modasar Rasul
Learner Enhancement Officer
Room MB369a
0121 204 5226
pgmentoring@aston.ac.uk

Becoming a Postgraduate Mentor allowed me to meet many new people and also enhanced my emotional intelligence, team working and listening skills. Richard - Postgraduate Mentor

 

Employable Graduates; Exploitable Research