.

Professor Robin Martin

Work & Organisational Psychology Group

Robin Martin

Position: Professor of Social and Organisational Psychology
Email: r.martin@aston.ac.uk
Phone: +44(0)121 204 4293
Room: SW724

Professor Robin Martin gives an Inaugural Lecture on Getting on with the boss.
  • 1982 - 1985: PhD in Social Psychology, Open University, Milton Keynes, (Thesis: Social Categorization and Minority Influence)

  • 1979 - 1982: B.A. (Hons) in Psychology, Plymouth University, Plymouth

  • May 2000 - August 2006: Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of Center for Organisational Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

  • June 1998 - May 2000: Senior Lecturer in Psychology, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff

  • January 1996 - May 1998: Lecturer in Psychology, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff

  • October 1990 - December 1995: Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Wales, Swansea

  • October 1985 - September 1990: Research Fellow, MRC/ESRC Social and Applied Psychology Unit, University of Sheffield, Sheffield

  • Social influence processes, especially from numerical majorities and minorities

  • Persuasion and attitude change

  • Workplace leadership

  • Motivation

  • Teamworking

  • Innovation

Book

  • Martin, R. & Hewstone, M. (Eds.) (2010).  Minority influence and innovation: Antecedents, processes and consequences.  Hove, E. Sussex: Psychology Press. (to be translated into Greek by Pedio Publishing, S.A.)

Refereed Journals and Annuals

  • Epitropaki, O., & Martin, R (2013). Transformational-transactional leadership and upward influence: The role of Relative Leader-Member Exchanges (RLMX) and Perceived Organizational Support (POS). Leadership Quarterly24, 299-315.

  • Martin, P.Y., & Martin, R (2013). Morningness-eveningness orientation and attitude change: Evidence for greater systematic processing and attitude change at optimal time-of-day. Personality and Individual Differences54, 551-556.

  • Thomas, G., Martin, R., Epitropaki, O., Guillaume, Y., & Lee, A. (2013). Social cognition in leader-follower relationships: Applying insights from relationship science to understanding relationship-based approaches to leadership. Journal of Organizational Behavior, in press.

  • Thomas, G., Martin, R., & Riggio, R.E. (2013). Leading groups: Leadership as a group process. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations,16, 3-16.

  • Yeow, J., & Martin, R (2013). The role of self-regulation in developing leaders: A longitudinal field experiment. Leadership Quarterly, in press.

  • Jackson, C.J., Hobman, E.V., Jimmieson, N.L., & Martin, R. (2012). Do left and right asymmetries of hemispheric preference interact with attention to predict local and global performance in applied tasks? Laterality,17, 647-672.

  • Senior, C., Martin, R., Thomas, G., Topakas, A., West, M., & Yeates, R. (2012).  Developmental stability and leadership effectiveness. Leadership Quarterly23, 281-291.

  • Senior C, Martin R, West MA & Yeats R. (2011).  How can earlobes signal leadership potential? Harvard Business Review, 89, 32.

  • Hobman, E.V., Jackson, C.J., Jimmieson, N.L., & Martin, R. (2011).  The effects of transformational leadership behaviors on follower outcomes: An identity-based analysis. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 20, 553-580.

  • Martin, R., Epitropaki, O., Thomas, G., & Topakas, A. (2010).  A critical review of Leader-Member Relationship (LMX) research: Future prospects and directions. International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 25, 61-91.

  • Jackson, C.J., Hobman, E.V., Jimmieson, N.L., & Martin, R. (2009).  Comparing different approach and avoidance models of learning and personality in the prediction of work, University and leadership outcomes. British Journal of Psychology, 100, 283-312.

  • Hooper, D., & Martin, R. (2008). Beyond personal Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) quality: The effects of perceived LMX variability on employee reactions. Leadership Quarterly, 19, 20-30.

  • Kenworthy, J., Hewstone, M., Levine, J., Martin, R., & Willis, H. (2008). The phenomenology of minority-majority status: Effects on innovation in argument generation.  European Journal of Social Psychology, 38, 624-636.

  • Martin, R., & Hewstone, M. (2008).  Majority versus minority influence, message processing and attitude change: The Source-Context-Elaboration Model.  Advances in Experimental Social Psychology40, 237-326.

  • Martin, R., Hewstone, M. & Martin, P.Y. (2008).  Majority versus minority influence: The role of message processing in determining resistance to counter-persuasion. European Journal of Social Psychology, 38, 16-34.

  • Sumner-Armstrong, C., Newcombe, P., & Martin, R. (2008).  A qualitative investigation into leader behavioural flexibility. Journal of Management Development, 27, 843-857.

  • Martin, P.Y., Hamilton, V.E., McKimmie, B.M., Terry, D.J., & Martin, R. (2007).  Effects of caffeine on persuasion and attitude change: The role of secondary tasks in manipulating systematic message processing. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37, 320-338.

  • Martin, R., Hewstone, M. & Martin, P.Y. (2007).  Systematic and heuristic processing of majority- and minority-endorsed messages: The effects of varying outcome relevance and levels of orientation on attitude and message processing. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33, 43-56.

  • Martin, R., Martin, P.Y., Smith, J.R. & Hewstone, M. (2007).  Majority versus minority influence and prediction of behavioral intentions and behavior. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 43, 763-771.

  • Smith, J. R., Hogg, M. A., Martin R., & Terry, D. J. (2007).  Uncertainty and influence in the attitude-behaviour relationship. British Journal of Social Psychology, 46, 769-792.

  • Martin, P.Y., & Martin, R. (2006).  The effects of caffeine consumption on direct and indirect majority and minority influence. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 36, 1961-1979.

  • Epitropaki, O., & Martin, R. (2005).  The role of individual differences in the relation between transformational/transactional leadership and organizational identification. Leadership Quarterly, 16, 569-589.

  • Epitropaki, O., & Martin, R. (2005).  From ideal to real: A longitudinal study of implicit leadership theories, leader-member exchanges and employee outcomes. Journal of Applied Psychology, 90, 659-676.

  • Gardikiotis, A., Martin, R., & Hewstone, M. (2005).  Group consensus in social influence: Type of consensus information as a moderator of majority and minority influence. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 31, 1163-1174.

  • Hogg, M. A., Martin, R., Epitropaki, O., Mankad, A., Svensson, A., & Weeden, K. (2005). Effective leadership in salient groups: Revisiting leader-member exchange theory from the perspective of the social identity theory of leadership. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin31, 991-1004

  • Martin, R., Thomas, G., Charles, C., Epitropaki, O., & McNamara, R. (2005).  The role of Leader -Member Exchanges in mediating the relationship between locus of control and work reactions. Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology78, 141-147.

  • Martin, P.Y., Laing, J., Martin, R., & Mitchell, M. (2005).  Caffeine, cognition, and persuasion: Evidence for caffeine increasing the systematic processing of persuasive messages. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 35, 160-182.

  • Epitropaki, O., & Martin, R. (2004).  Implicit Leadership Theories in applied settings: Factor structure, generalizability and stability over time. Journal of Applied Psychology89, 293-310.

  • Gardikiotis, A., Martin, R., & Hewstone, M. (2004).  The representation of majorities and minorities in the British Press: A content analytic approach.  European Journal of Social Psychology, 34, 637-646.

  • Martin, R., & Hewstone, M.  (2003).  Majority versus minority influence: When, not whether, source status instigates heuristic or systematic processing. European Journal of Social Psychology33, 313-330.

  • Martin, R., Hewstone, M., & Martin, P.Y. (2003).  Resistance to persuasive messages as a function of majority and minority source status.  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology39, 585-593.

  • Martin, R., Gardikiotis, A., & Hewstone, M. (2002). Levels of consensus and majority and minority influence. European Journal of Social Psychology, 32, 645-665.

  • Martin, R., & Epitropaki, O. (2001).  Role of organizational identification, on Implicit Leadership Theories (ILTs), transformational leadership and work attitudes. GroupProcesses and Intergroup Relations, 4, 247-262.

  • Martin, R., Leach, D.J., Norman, P., & Silvester, J. (2000).  The role of attributions in reactions to job relocation. Work & Stress, 14, 347-361.

  • Epitropaki, O., & Martin, R. (1999)  The impact of demography on the quality of leader-member exchanges (LMX) and employees’ work attitudes and well-being. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 72, 237-240.

  • Martin, R. (1999).  Adjusting to job relocation: Relocation preparation can reduce relocation stress. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 72, 231-235.

  • Martin, R., & Hewstone, M. (1999).  Minority influence and optimal problem-solving. European Journal of Social Psychology, 29, 825-832.

  • Martin, R. (1998).  Majority and minority influence using the afterimage paradigm: A series of attempted replications. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 34, 1-26.

  • Jackson, P.R., & Martin, R. (1996). The impact of just-in-time on job content, employee attitudes and well-being: A longitudinal Study. Ergonomics, 39, 1-16.

  • Martin, R. (1996).  A longitudinal study examining the psychological reactions of job relocation. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 26, 265-282.

  • Martin, R. (1996).  Minority influence and argument generation. British Journal of Social Psychology, 35, 91-103.

  • Martin, R. (1995). The effects of prior moves on job relocation stress. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 68, 49-56.

  • Martin, R. (1995). Majority and minority influence using the afterimage paradigm: A replication with an unambiguous blue slide. European Journal of Social Psychology, 25, 373-381.

  • Martin, R., & Davids, K. (1995). A longitudinal study of the effects of team building. Journal of Social Psychology, 135, 533-535.

  • Norman, P., Collins, S., Connor, M., Martin, R., & Rance, J. (1995)  Attributions, cognitions and coping styles: Teleworkers' reactions to work-related problems. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 25, 117-128.

  • Jackson, P.R., Wall, T.D., Martin, R., & Davids, K. (1993).  New measures of job control, cognitive demand and production responsibility. Journal of Applied Psychology, 78, 753‑762.

  • Davids, K., & Martin, R. (1992). Shopfloor attitudes towards advanced manufacturing technology (AMT): The changing focus of industrial conflict?  Interacting with Computers, 200‑208.

  • Martin, R. (1992). The effects of ingroup‑outgroup membership on minority influence when group membership is determined by a trivial categorisation. Social Behaviour and Personality, 20, 131‑142.

  • Davids, K., Martin, R., & McHale, S. (1991). Development training in the context of professional football. Physical Education Review, 14, 14‑23.

  • Davids, K., Smith, L., & Martin, R. (1991). System performance and  uncertainty in sport and industry: Controlling variance at source. Applied Ergonomics, 22, 312‑315.

  • Martin, R. (1991). School children's attitudes towards computers as a function of gender, course subjects and availability of home computers. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 7, 187‑194.

  • Davids, K., & Martin, R. (1990). Shopfloor rebellions. Industrial Society, March, 26‑27.

  • Davids, K., Martin, R., & McHale, S. (1990). Managing team work in professional football: When sport and occupational psychology overlap. Research Bi‑Annual for Movement, 7, 1‑6.

  • Martin, R., & Wall, T.D. (1990).  Double machine operation and psychological strain. Work &  Stress, 3, 323‑326.

  • Wall, T.D., Corbett, J.M., Clegg, C.W., Jackson, P.R., & Martin. R. (1990).  Advanced Manufacturing Technology and Work Design: Towards a theoretical framework. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 11, 201‑219.

  • Wall, T.D., Corbett, J.M., Martin, R., Clegg, C.W., & Jackson, P.R. (1990). Applied Manufacturing Technology, work design and performance: A change study. Journal of Applied Psychology, 75,  691‑697.

  • Corbett, J.M., Martin, R., Wall, T.D., & Clegg, C.W. (1989). Technological coupling as a predictor of intrinsic job satisfaction: A replication study. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 10, 91‑ 95.

  • Martin, R., & Wall, T.D. (1989). Attentional demand and cost responsibility as stressors in shopfloor jobs. Academy of Management Journal, 32, 69‑86

  • Martin, R. (1988).  Ingroup and outgroup minorities: Differential impact upon public and private responses. European Journal of Social Psychology, 18, 39‑52.

  • Martin, R. (1988).  Minority influence and social categorization: A replication. European Journal of Social Psychology, 18, 369‑373.       

  • Martin, R. (1988).  Minority influence and 'trivial' social categorization. European Journal of Social Psychology, 18, 465‑470.

  • Martin, R. (1988).  Attitudes towards Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT): The role of AMT experience, skill level and job involvement. Social Behaviour, 3, 297‑305.

  • Martin, R., & Jackson, P.R. (1988).  Matching AMT jobs to people. Personnel Management, December, 48‑51.

  • Martin, R. (1987).  New jobs for new technology. Industrial Society, September, 34‑35.

  • Wall, T.D., & Martin, R. (1987).  Job and work design. International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology2, 61-91.

Book Chapters

  • Hewstone, M., & Martin, R.  Social influence processes. In M. Hewstone, W. Stroebe, and K. Jonas (Eds.), Introduction to social psychology: A European perspective (5th Edition).  London: Blackwell.

  • Martin, R.  The case and context for quality working relationships.  In C.L. Heimer-Rathbone (Ed.), Ready for change. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.

  • Martin, R. & Hewstone, M. Minority influence: Revisiting Moscovici’s blue-green afterimage studies. In J. R. Smith and S. A. Haslam (Eds.), Refreshing social psychology. London: Sage.

  • Gardikiotis, A., Martin, R. & Hewstone, M. (2010).  The impact of source consensus on majority and minority influence. In R. Martin and M. Hewstone (Eds.), Minority influence and innovation: Antecedents, processes and consequences (pp. 153-174). Hove, E. Sussex: Psychology Press.

  • Hewstone, M., & Martin, R. (2010).  Minority influence: From groups to attitudes and back again. In R. Martin and M. Hewstone (Eds.), Minority influence and innovation: Antecedents, processes and consequences (pp. 365-394). Hove, E. Sussex: Psychology Press.

  • Martin, R. (2010).  Leader categorization theory. In J.M. Levine and M. A. Hogg (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Group Processes and Intergroup Relations (pp. 515-517). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

  • Martin, R. (2010).  Path-goal theory. In J.M. Levine and M. A. Hogg (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Group Processes and Intergroup Relations (pp. 635-636). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

  • Martin, R. (2010).  Vertical Dyad Linkage model (2010).  In J.M. Levine and M. A. Hogg (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Group Processes and Intergroup Relations (pp. 947-949). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

  • Martin, R. & Hewstone, M. (2010).  Introduction: Theory and research on minority influence. In R. Martin and M. Hewstone (Eds.), Minority influence and innovation: Antecedents, processes and consequences (pp. 3-18).Hove, E. Sussex: Psychology Press.

  • Martin, R., Hewstone, M., & Martin P.Y. (2010).  Consequences of attitudes changed by majority and minority influence.In R. Martin and M. Hewstone, (Eds.) (2010), Minority influence and innovation: Antecedents, processes and consequences . Hove, E. Sussex: Psychology Press.

  • Hewstone, M., & Martin, R. (2008).  Social influence. In M. Hewstone, W. Stroebe, and K. Jonas (Eds.), Introduction to social psychology: A European perspective (4th edition, pp. 216-243).  London: Blackwell.

  • Martin, R., Hewstone, M., Martin, P.Y., & Gardikiotis, A. (2008).  Persuasion from majority and minority groups.  In W. Crano and R. Prislin (Eds.), Attitudes and attitude change (pp. 361-384). New York: Psychology Press.

  • Martin, R., & Hewstone, M. (2003).  Social influence processes of control and change: Conformity, obedience to authority, and innovation.  In M.A. Hogg and J. Cooper (Eds.), The Sage handbook of social psychology: Concise student edition (pp. 312-332). London: Sage.

  • Hooper, D., & Martin, R. (2006).  Beyond personal LMX quality: The effects of perceived LMX variability on employee reactions. In A.I. Glendon, B. Myors and B.M. Thompson (Eds.), Advances in Organizational Psychology: An Asia-Pacific Perspective. Brisbane: Australian Academic Press.

  • Martin, R., & Martin, P.Y. (2005).  Social influence. G. Davey (Ed.), Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Psychology (pp. 280-281). London: Hodder Arnold.

  • Hogg, M.A., & Martin, R. (2003).  Social identity analysis of leader-member relations:

  • Reconciling self-categorization and leader-member exchange theories of leadership.  In S.A. Haslam, D. van Knippenberg, M. Platow, and N. Ellemers (Eds.), Social identity at work:

  • Developing theory for organizational practice (pp. 139-154). Philadelphia, PA: Psychology Press.

  • Hogg, M.A., Martin, R., Weedon, K. (2003).  Transactional leadership and social identity. In D. van Knippenberg and M.A. Hogg (Eds.), Leadership and power: Identity processes in groups and organizations (pp. 18-33). London: Sage.

  • Martin, R., & Hewstone, M. (2003).  Social influence processes of control and change: Conformity, obedience to authority, and innovation.  In M.A. Hogg and J. Cooper (Eds.), SageHandbook of Social Psychology (pp. 347-366). London: Sage.

  • Hewstone, M., Martin, R., Hamer-Hewstone, C., Crisp, R..J., & Voci, A. (2001).  Majority-minority relations in organizations: Challenges and opportunities.  In M.A. Hogg and D. J.

  • Terry (Eds.), Social identity processes in organizational contexts (pp. 67-86). Hove, E.Sussex: Psychology Press.

  • Martin, R., & Hewstone, M. (2001).  Conformity and independence in groups: Majorities and minorities.  In. M.A. Hogg and R.S. Tindale (Eds.), Blackwell handbook of social psychology, Vol. 13: Group processes (pp. 209-234). Oxford: Blackwell

  • Martin, R., & Hewstone, M. (2001).  Determinants and consequences of cognitive processes in  majority and minority influence.  In J. Forgas and K. Williams (Eds.), Social influence: Direct and indirect processes (pp. 315-330). Philadelphia: Psychology Press.

  • Martin, R., & Hewstone, M. (2001).  Afterthoughts on after-images: A review of the literature using the afterimage paradigm in majority and minority influence.  In C. De Dreu and N. De Vries (Eds.), Group innovation: Fundamental and applied perspectives (pp. 15-39). Oxford:Blackwell.

  • Wall, T.D., & Martin, R. (1994). Job and work design.  In I.T. Robertson, and C.L. Cooper (Eds.), Key reviews in organisational behaviour: Key concepts, theories and practices revisited (pp. 158-188). Chichester, UK: Wiley.

  • Martin, R. (1992). Technical change and work organisation: Introduction.  In D.M. Hosking, & N. Anderson (Eds.), Organising changes and innovations: European psychological Perspectives (pp. 179-182)London: Routledge.

  • Martin, R., & Davids, K. (1992). Computer aided manufacturing and job design. In D.M. Hosking, and N. Anderson (Eds.), Organising changes and innovations: European psychological perspectives (240-255).  London: Routledge.

  • Martin, R. (1991). Working in groups.  In M.Smith (Ed.), Analysing organizational behaviour (pp. 154-177). Bassingstoke: Macmillan.

  • Martin, R. (1991). Influencia minoritaria y relaciones entre grupos. In S. Moscovici, G. Mugny, and J.A. Peréz (Eds.), La influencia social inconsciente: Estudios de psicologia social Experiment (pp. 107-125)Barcelona: Anthropes.

  • Wall, T.D., & Martin, R. (1991). Work organization for CNC drilling machines. In K. Legge, C.W. Clegg, and N.J. Kemp (Eds.), Case studies in information technology (pp. 75-83). Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

  • Wall, T.D., & Martin, R. (1991). Work organization for CNC drilling machines: Teachers' guide. In K. Legge, C.W. Clegg, and N.J. Kemp (Eds.), Case studies in information technology: Teachers guide. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

  • Davids, K., & Martin, R. (1990). Team building in English  professional football.  In Santilli (Ed.), Sports medicine applied to football. Rome: Coni.

  • Martin, R. (1990).  A framework for studying the psychological effects of Advanced Manufacturing Technology. In C.M. Haslegrave, J.R. Wilson, E.N. Corlett, and I. Menenica (Eds.), Work design in practice (pp. 230-235). London: Taylor and Francis.

  • Martin, R. (1987).  Influence minoritaire et relations entre groupes (Minority influence and intergroup relations). In S. Moscovici and G. Mugny (Eds.), Psychologie de la conversion: etudes sur l'influence inconsciente (pp. 89-103). Cousset, Switzerland: Del Val.

Employable Graduates; Exploitable Research