.

Professor Stephanie Decker

Economics and Strategy Group

Stephanie

Stephanie Decker is a Professor in Organization Studies and History at Aston Business School, where she has been working since 2010. After completing her PhD in history at the University of Liverpool in 2006, she held postdoctoral appointments at the LSE and Harvard Business School, before joining the University of Liverpool Management School in 2007/8.

She teaches qualitative approaches to international business & strategy, and is interested in supervising doctoral research in this area (e.g. internationalisation, multinational strategy, and issues in emerging and developing economies). She has presented her work at a variety of universities in the UK, Europe, America and Africa, as well as external organisations such as the World Bank.

Position: Professor
Phone:+44(0)121 204 3268
Email: s.decker@aston.ac.uk
Room: SW1013
Website 

  • PGCert, 2010. Subject: Teaching & Learning in Higher Education

  • Ph D, University of Liverpool, History, 2006. Subject: History

  • MA, University of Liverpool, 2001. Subject: History

  • BA Equivalent, University of Cologne, 2000. Subject: History, Anthropology, International LaW     

Academic

  • Professor, Aston Business School. (August 2014 - Present)

  • Senior Lecturer, Aston Business School. (August 1, 2012 - August 2014)

  • Lecturer, Aston Business School. (September 2010 - July 31, 2012)

  • Lecturer, University of Liverpool Management School. (January 2007 - September 2010)

  • Research fellow, Humboldt University, Berlin. (September 2009 - October 2009)

  • Research fellow, Harvard Business School. (July 2007 - July 2008)

  • Research fellow, ESRC/London School of Economics. (January 2006 - January 2007)

An example of Stephanie's teaching can be found here:

Stephanie’s research interests fall into two related areas: business and development in sub-Saharan Africa, and the use of historical analysis for management and organization studies. Her research on Africa has focused on the history of multinationals investing in Ghana and Nigeria, and the legacy of colonialism for organizational legitimacy. She received funding from the British Academy and the Economic and Social Science Research Council UK (ESRC) in support of this research. Her second area of research interest is in the area of historical theory and methodology within management and organization studies. This focuses on integrating historical approaches, primarily archival research influenced by postcolonial theory, ethnographic history and microhistory into social scientific research data analysis techniques such as documentary and process-based qualitative studies.This research is currently being supported by the Leverhulme Trust and the ESRC.   

Stephanie is a member of Aston Business School’s Social Responsibility & Sustainability Network.

  • ESRC seminar series “Organizations and Society: Historicising the theory and practice of organization analysis”, 2015-16, £29,370
  • Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship, 2014-2015, £42,500
  • Member of AHRC funded research network on “Imagining Markets”
  • British Academy Small Grant, 2009-2011, £6,700
  • Suad Al-Bulushi, “SME and Entrepreneurship developmet in Oman: The role of govenrment”
  • George Obeng Dankwah, “Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) concept and the Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP) strategy at the Private Sector Business In Ghana”
  • Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA) 
  • Co-editor of BusinessHistory
  • Member of the editorial team for the NEP-HIS blog 

A number of Stephanie's publications are freely available here. 

  • Stephanie Decker (forthcoming) “Solid Intentions: An Archival Ethnography of Corporate Architecture and Organizational Remembering”, Organization. 
  • Michael Rowlinson, John Hassard, Stephanie Decker (forthcoming) “Research Strategies for Organizational History: A Dialogue between Organization Theory and Historical Theory”, Academy of Management Review. 
  • Stephanie Decker (2013) “The Silence of the Archives: Postcolonialism and Business History”, Management and Organisational History  8,2. 
  • Stephanie Decker(2011) “Corporate Political Activity in Less Developed Countries: The Volta River Project in Ghana, 1959-1966”, Business History 53,7. 
  • Stephanie Decker (2011) “No Longer at Ease: Corruption as in Institution in West Africa”, with Dmitri van den Bersselaar, International Journal of Public Administration  34,11. 
  • Stephanie Decker (2010) “Postcolonial Transitions in Africa: Decolonization in West Africa and present day South Africa”, Journal of Management Studies, 47,5.

Refereed journals     

  • Decker, S., Kipping, M., & Wadhwani, R. D. (2015). New Business Histories! Plurality in business history research methods. Business History. doi: 10.1080/00076791.2014.977870

  • Decker, S. (2014). Solid Intentions: An Archival Ethnography of Corporate Architecture and Organizational Remembering. Organization, 21(4), 514-542.           

  • Michael Rowlinson, John Hassard, Stephanie Decker (forthcoming) “Research Strategies for Organizational History: A Dialogue between Organization Theory and Historical Theory”, Academy of Management Review. 
  • Stephanie Decker (2013) “The Silence of the Archives: Postcolonialism and Business History”, Management and Organisational History  8,2. 
  • Stephanie Decker(2011) “Corporate Political Activity in Less Developed Countries: The Volta River Project in Ghana, 1959-1966”, Business History 53,7. 
  • Stephanie Decker (2011) “No Longer at Ease: Corruption as in Institution in West Africa”, with Dmitri van den Bersselaar, International Journal of Public Administration  34,11. 
  • Stephanie Decker (2010) “Postcolonial Transitions in Africa: Decolonization in West Africa and present day South Africa”, Journal of Management Studies, 47,5. 
  • Stephanie Decker (2008) “Wirtschaftsnationalismus und Dekolonisation der Wirtschaft”, (transl. Economic nationalism and economic decolonization), Archiv für Sozialgeschichte 48 (transl. Archive for Social History). 
  • Stephanie Decker (2008) “Building up Goodwill: British Business, Development and Economic Nationalism in Ghana and Nigeria, 1945-1977”, Enterprise & Society 9,4.  
  • Stephanie Decker (2007) “Advertising and Corporate Legitimacy: British multinationals and the rhetoric of development from the 1950s to the 1970s”, Business History Review, 81, Spring. 
  • Stephanie Decker (2005) “Decolonising Barclays Bank DCO? Corporate Africanisation programmes in Nigeria, 1945 –1969”, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History 33,3, September.

Book chapters     

  • Decker, S. (2015) “Mothership Reconnection: Microhistory and Institutional Work”, Routledge Companion to Management and Organizational History, ed. By Terrence Weatherbee, Albert J Mills, Patricia Genoe MacLaren

  • Stephanie Decker (2008) “Return to Imperial Trade? John Holt & Co (Liverpool) Ltd. as a Contemporary Free-standing Company, 1945-2006”, Chap. 9 in The Empire in One City? Liverpool's Inconvenient Imperial Past, Studies in Imperialism (Manchester: Manchester University Press).

Teaching cases    

  • Stephanie Decker, “Herman Chinery-Hesse: The Bill Gates of Ghana?”, Teaching case for Aston Business School. 
  • Jones, G., Decker, S. (2007). Unilever as a ‘multi-local multinational’ 1945-1979. Harvard Business School Case 808-025.

Blogs and newsletter contributions    

Book reviews   

  • Hausman, William J., Hertner, Peter, & Wilkins, Mira (Eds.) (2012) Global Electrification: Multinational Enterprise and International Finance in the History of Light and Power, 1878-2007. Enterprise & Society 13,2. 
  • Kathleen E. A. Monteith (2010) Depression to Decolonization: Barclays Bank (DCO) in the West Indies, 1926-1962. Business History Review 84,4. 
  • Teresa da Silva Lopes (2009) Global Brands: The Evolution of Multinationals in Alcoholic Beverages. Business History Review 83,1. 
  • Hartmut Berghoff (ed.) (2008) Margetinggeschichte: Die Genese einer modernen Sozialtechnik. Business History 50,3. 
  • Adodeyi Olukoju (2008) The Liverpool of West Africa: The Dynamics and Impact of Maritime Trade in Lagos 1900–1950. African Studies Review 51,1. 
  • Toyin Falola (2007) Economic Reforms and Modernization in Nigeria, 1945-1965. African Studies Review 50, 2.

Administrative Roles and Responsibilities

  • Deputy representative for ABS to Programmes Approvals Sub-Committee, School. (November 2013 - Present)
  • Development of MSc International Management for Danang, School. (January 2013 - Present)
  • MSc IB co-course director, School. (September 2010 - August 2014)

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