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FT rates Aston Business School Masters programmes as Top Five

aston business school

17 September 2012

Aston Business School has achieved a strong presence in the top ten of the Financial Times Masters in Management Rankings.

The Business School was placed joint fifth in the UK and a creditable 36th in the world for its MSc International Business programme.


Aston Business School continues to excel in employability and we maintained a very strong 4th in world and 3rd in UK for careers. The careers ranking is calculated according to the level of seniority and the size of company alumni are now working in, and reflects Aston’s enviable record for placing graduates in top jobs.

Professor Nigel Driffield, Interim-Executive Dean of Aston Business School, said:

“I am delighted that the FT continues to recognise our MSc International Business as one of the very top Masters in Management programmes, this is a testament to the hard work and expertise of a very strong department.

The employability rankings were equally excellent, the careers support and industry links we pride ourselves on mean that even in a tough employment market an Aston MSc will allow you to compete for the very top jobs in the global employment market.”


The FT Masters in Management Ranking is recognised as one the of the leading league tables of business education.  The rankings give a thorough assessment of masters in management programmes from across the globe, as well as giving insight into Business Schools and their alumni.  Programme rankings are established by looking at factors including value for money, salary today, placement success and the percentage of international students.

There are approximately 7,622 business schools in the world, 766 in Europe and 102 in the UK.

*Aston Business School was ranked joint 5th with University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

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For more information on Aston Business School’s rankings, please contact Katy Barry, Rankings and Quality Officer at Aston Business School, on 0121 204 4556

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