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European Masters will deliver global managers

27 September 2006 – for immediate release

A groundbreaking new European Masters in Management degree is set to change the face of international business education.

A joint initiative between Aston Business School in Birmingham, EM-Lyon, France and Ludwig Maximilians University, in Munich, Germany, the European Masters in Management will give students a unique opportunity to study under academics from all three high profile business schools.

The first intake of the new two-year programme – which combines both studying and an internship or job placement in industry - will start in October 2007 with recruitment commencing in the autumn.

Students will take their first two terms of core subjects at one of the three schools with professors from France, Germany and the UK mobilising to teach students. The ‘base’ school will change every two years. Following an extended internship, the second year will be devoted to the students’ specialism - either marketing, corporate finance or organisation, strategy and change.

As well as offering the students a new challenge the initiative is also unique for university staff who will move between the three schools.

‘The European Masters is about creating tomorrow’s globally-oriented manager,’ explains Professor John Saunders, Head of Aston Business School. ‘Just as the world’s best soccer teams draw the best from across the world, so will tomorrow’s companies recruit globally and need managers to work in multicultural teams.

‘Already most of Aston’s graduates start their careers in non-UK based multinationals and the European Masters will produce managers trained across borders with people from many nations.

‘We will be creating tomorrow’s global manager today.’

Patrick Molle, president of EM-Lyon Business School said: ‘The curriculum integrates three European perspectives on common business situations and processes, as well as a European outlook on the rest of the world. The location of the three institutions - in major cities outside the capitals - offers great potential for economic and cultural development.’

Manfred Schwaiger of Ludwig Maximilians University said: ‘We truly appreciate the chance to bring together students from all over the world to face the challenges of modern management in multinational groups. Due to its particular education system, Germany has been kind of isolated in the past - together with our partners from Lyon and Birmingham we will be striving to offer most attractive programmes in order to turn today’s students into tomorrow’s high-potentials.’

The first intake in 2007 is expected to total 45, rising to 75 for later intakes. For further information on the European Masters in Management go to:

www.european-master.com

www.abs.aston.ac.uk

www.em-lyon.com

www.lmu.de.

The new Masters programme will be officially launched at Forbes House in Belgravia, London, on October 12 with representatives of the cities of Birmingham, Lyon and Munich taking part.

For further press information please contact Paul Groves on ext 3025 or p.groves@aston.ac.uk.

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