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Aston injects expertise to combat major diseases

13 July 2004

Aston injects expertise to combat major diseases

RESEARCHERS AT A MIDLANDS UNIVERSITY have begun work on a groundbreaking project that will help combat major diseases including cancer and brain disorders.

Aston University's Professors David Lowe and Ian Nabney have helped construct a team of 31 organisations from around Europe on the €6.4 million project.

The four year undertaking looks at the relatively new field of bio-pattern and bio-profile analysis. A bio-pattern is the basic information that provides clues about underlying clinical evidence for diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

A bio-profile is a personal 'fingerprint' that fuses together a person's current and past medical history, bio-pattern and prognosis.

The 'bio-pattern network of excellence' project will help Europe become a world leader in e-healthcare by developing techniques for the analysis of an individuals' bio-profile and making them remotely accessible to patients and clinicians.

The project aims to identify how bio-profiles could be exploited for individualised healthcare such as disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Aston University's Professor David Lowe said: 'Combining our local expertise in information analysis with clinical, computing and communications experts across Europe provides a rare opportunity for developing future, truly personalised and active healthcare management systems.'

Dr Elia Biganzoli, from the Unit of Medical Statistics and Biometry of the National Cancer Institute, Milan, who leads the team of experts in Milan, said: 'We see the key benefits of [this collaboration] in the multidisciplinary approach for bioprofile analysis.

'The synergy from joint efforts of researchers from different fields is needed to offer the EU citizen a realistic perspective of the improvement of patient care through the exploitation of biopatterns.'

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For further information please call 0121 204 4549 or email: b.a.l.coombes@aston.ac.uk

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